Amoxicillin injection

Posted: pux Date of post: 26-Feb-2019
<i>Amoxicillin</i> Amoxil Drug Side Effects, User

Amoxicillin Amoxil Drug Side Effects, User

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Longamox - Long-acting <i>Amoxicillin</i> <i>Injection</i> in a Bio-compatible.

Longamox - Long-acting Amoxicillin Injection in a Bio-compatible.

Class: Aminopenicillins Chemical Name: [2S-[2α,5α,6β(S*)]]-6-[[Amino(4-hydroxyphenyl)acetyl]amino]-3,3-dimethyl-7-oxo-4-thia-1-azabicyclo[3.2.0]heptane-2-carboxylic acid trihydrate CAS Number: 61336-70-7 Medically reviewed on Sep 3, 2018 AAP, AAFP, CDC, and others consider amoxicillin the drug of first choice for initial treatment of AOM, unless the infection is suspected of being caused by β-lactamase-producing bacteria resistant to the drug, in which case the fixed combination of amoxicillin and clavulanate is recommended for initial treatment. AAP, AAFP, and others recommend watchful waiting for 3 months from date of effusion onset or diagnosis in those 2 months to 12 years of age who are not at risk for speech, language, or learning problems; some suggest a short course of anti-infectives may be considered for possible short-term benefits when parent and/or caregiver expresses a strong aversion to impending surgery. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins; 198-341, 418-73, 607-722. AAP, IDSA, and AHA recommend a penicillin regimen (i.e., 10 days of oral penicillin V or oral amoxicillin or single dose of IM penicillin G benzathine) as treatment of choice for S. pyogenes pharyngitis and tonsillitis; Alternative regimens recommended for retreatment include a narrow-spectrum oral cephalosporin, oral clindamycin, oral fixed combination of amoxicillin and clavulanate, oral macrolide, or IM penicillin G benzathine. Consider that multiple, recurrent episodes of symptomatic pharyngitis within a period of several months to years may indicate that patient is a long-term pharyngeal carrier of S. pyogenes experiencing repeated episodes of nonstreptococcal (e.g., viral) pharyngitis. Eradication of the carrier state may be desirable in certain situations (e.g., community outbreak of acute rheumatic fever, acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, or invasive S. pyogenes pharyngitis in a closed or partially closed community; multiple episodes of documented symptomatic S. Bactericidal action of β-lactam antibiotics on Escherichia coli with particular reference to ampicillin and amoxycillin. This combination results in an antibiotic with an increased spectrum of action and restored efficacy against amoxicillin-resistant bacteria that produce β-lactamase. Possible side effects include diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, thrush, and skin rash. As with all antimicrobial agents, antibiotic-associated diarrhea due to Clostridium difficile infection—sometimes leading to pseudomembranous colitis—may occur during or after treatment with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Rarely, cholestatic jaundice (also referred to as cholestatic hepatitis, a form of liver toxicity) has been associated with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. The reaction may occur up to several weeks after treatment has stopped, and usually takes weeks to resolve. It is more frequent in men, older people, and those who have taken long courses of treatment; the estimated overall incidence is one in 100,000 exposures. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid is the International Nonproprietary Name (INN) and co-amoxiclav is the British Approved Name (BAN). Many branded products indicate their strengths as the quantity of amoxicillin.

<i>AMOXICILLIN</i> Drug BNF content published by NICE
AMOXICILLIN Drug BNF content published by NICE

By intramuscular injection. By intravenous injection, or by intravenous infusion. Amoxicillin doses in BNF Publications may differ from those in product. Administered by intramuscular i.m. or subcutaneous s.c. injection in cattle. For sheep, amoxicillin is approved for use as a sterile i.m. injection suspension.

Amoxicillin injection
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