Xanax risks

Posted: RedMan Date of post: 16-Feb-2019
<b>Xanax</b> - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses

Xanax - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses

We use cookies and similar technologies to improve your browsing experience, personalize content and offers, show targeted ads, analyze traffic, and better understand you. We may share your information with third-party partners for marketing purposes. To learn more and make choices about data use, visit our Advertising Policy and Privacy Policy. By clicking “Accept and Continue” below, (1) you consent to these activities unless and until you withdraw your consent using our rights request form, and (2) you consent to allow your data to be transferred, processed, and stored in the United States. Amanda Lautieri is a Senior Content Editor at American Addiction Centers. She has more than 10 years of professional editing experience that includes working as a web editor for several major online publishers and editing medical content ranging from academic texts to online training and re-certification courses for emergency medical service responders., Xanax (alprazolam) was developed as an alternative medication to Valium (diazepam) for the treatment of anxiety, particularly panic attacks. Both Xanax and Valium are benzodiazepines, which are tranquilizer drugs or central nervous system depressant drugs that are primarily designed to treat anxiety and panic disorders. Benzodiazepines are generally classified as Schedule IV controlled substances by the United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), indicating that they have some potential for abuse and the development of physical dependence. Xanax has become one of the most prescribed benzodiazepines. Despite the intent to develop a safer drug that was less prone to abuse than Valium, Xanax is also a potential drug of abuse. Benzodiazepines are typically not primary drugs of abuse but most often abused with other drugs.

Alprazolam - Wikipedia

Alprazolam - Wikipedia

WARNING: RISKS FROM CONCOMITANT USE WITH OPIOIDS XANAX is a benzodiazepine medicine. Taking benzodiazepines with opioid medicines, alcohol, or other central nervous system depressants (including street drugs) can cause severe drowsiness, breathing problems (respiratory depression), coma, and death. Do not take XANAX if you are allergic to alprazolam, other benzodiazepines, or any of the ingredients in XANAX. Do not take XANAX if you are currently taking antifungal treatments including ketoconazole or itraconazole. XANAX is a federal controlled substance (C-IV) because it can be abused or lead to dependence. Keep XANAX in a safe place to prevent misuse and abuse. XANAX can make you sleepy or dizzy, and can slow your thinking and motor skills. However, it is not a first line treatment since the development of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Alprazolam is no longer recommended in Australia for the treatment of panic disorder due to concerns regarding tolerance, dependence, and abuse. Most evidence shows that the benefits of alprazolam in treating panic disorder last only 4 to 10 weeks. However, people with panic disorder have been treated on an open basis for up to 8 months without apparent loss of benefit. In the US, alprazolam is FDA-approved for the management of anxiety disorders (a condition corresponding most closely to the APA Diagnostic and Statistical Manual DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder) or the short-term relief of symptoms of anxiety. In the UK, alprazolam is recommended for the short-term treatment (2–4 weeks) of severe acute anxiety. Benzodiazepines require special precaution if used in children and in alcohol- or drug-dependent individuals.

The Dangers of Mixing Methadone with <b>Xanax</b>
The Dangers of Mixing Methadone with Xanax

As an opioid and benzodiazepine respectively, methadone and Xanax carry high risks when abused together including the risk of fatal overdose. Abuse of prescription drugs like Xanax comes with a host of dangers.

Xanax risks
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